Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix 

With the Order of the Phoenix just round the corner, here is a ready reckoner of all the gags in the book…🙂 Lets see how many of these actually make it to the movie script…

(After Lupin goes through a list of all the things they’ve done to discredit Dumbledore) “But Dumbledore says he doesn’t care what they do as long as they don’t take him off the Chocolate Frog Cards,” said Bill, grinning.

“Who’s Kreacher?”
“The house-elf who lives here,” said Ron. “Nutter. Never met one like him.”
“He is not a nutter,” said Hermione.
“His life’s ambition is to have his head cut off and stuck up on a plaque like his mother,” said Ron. “Is that normal, Hermione?”

“Well, we were always going to fail that one,” said Ron gloomily as they ascended the marble staircase. He had just made Harry feel rather better by telling him how he told the examiner in detail about the ugly man with a wart on his nose in the crystal ball, only to look up an realize he had been describing the examiner’s reflection.

A week after Fred and George’s departure, Harry witnessed Professor McGonagall walking right past Peeves, who was determinedly loosening a crystal chandelier, and could have sworn he heard her tell the poltergeist out of the corner of her mouth, “It unscrews the other way.”

“The hats have gone,” Hermione said happily. “Seems the house-elves do want freedom after all.”
“I wouldn’t bet on it,” Ron told her cuttingly. “They might not count as clothes. They didn’t look anything like hats to me, more like woolly bladders.”

“Cheers,” whispered George, wiping tears of laughter from his face. “Oh, I hope she tries Vanishing them next…they multiply by ten every time you try…”
The fireworks continued to burn and spread all over the school that afternoon. Though they caused plenty of disruption, the other teachers did not seem to mind them very much.
“Dear, dear,” said Professor McGonagall sardonically, as one of the dragons soared around her classroom, emitting loud bangs and exhaling flame. “Miss Brown, would you mind running along to the headmistress and informing her that we have an escaped firework in our classroom?”
“Thank you so much, Professor!” said Professor Flitwick in his squeaky little voice. “I could have got rid of the sparklers myself, of course, but I wasn’t sure whether I had the authority…”
Beaming, he closed the classroom door in Umbridge’s snarling face.

“How’d the exam go, Snivelly?” said James.
“I was watching him, his nose was touching the parchment,” said Sirius viciously. “There’ll be great grease marks all over it, they won’t be able to read a word.”

“You two,” she went on, gazing down at Fred and George, “are about to learn what happens to wrongdoers in my school.”
“You know what?” said Fred. “I don’t think we are.”
He turned to his twin.
“George,” said Fred, “I think we’ve outgrown a full-time education.”
“Yeah, I’ve been feeling that way myself,” said George lightly.
“Time to test our talents in the real world, d’you reckon?” asked Fred.
“Definitely,” said George.
And before Umbridge could say a word, they raised their wants and said together, “Accio Brooms!”
Harry heard a loud crash somewhere in the distance. Looking to his left he ducked just in time — Fred and George’s broomsticks, one still trailing the heavy chain and iron peg with which Umbridge had fastened them to the wall, were hurtling along the corridor toward their owners. They turned left, streaked down the stairs, and stopped sharply in front of the twins, the chain clattering loudly on the flagged stone floor.
“We won’t be seeing you,” Fred told Professor Umbridge, swinging his leg over his broomstick.
“Yeah, don’t bother to keep in touch,” said George, mounting his own.
Fred looked around at the assembled students, and at the silent, watchful crowd.
“If anybody fancies buying a Portable Swamp, as demonstrated upstairs, come to number ninety-three Diagon Alley – Weasley’s Wizard Wheezes,” he said in a loud voice. “Our new premises!”
“Special discounts to Hogwarts students who swear they’re going to use our products to get rid of this old bat,” said George, pointing at Professor Umbridge.
“STOP THEM!” shrieked Umbridge, but it was too late. As the Inquisitorial Squad closed in, Fred and George kicked off from the floor, shooting fifteen feet into the air, the iron peg swinging dangerously below. Fred looked across the hall at the poltergeist bobbing on his level above the crowd.
“Give her hell from us, Peeves.”
And Peeves, whom Harry had never seen take an order from a student before, swept his belled hat from his head and sprang to a salute as Fred and George wheeled about to tumultuous applause from the students below and sped out of the open front doors into the glorious sunset.

“And do I look like the kind of man that can be intimidated?” barked Uncle Vernon.
“Well…” said Moody, pushing back his bowler hat to reveal his sinisterly revolving eye. Uncle Vernon lept backward in horror and collided painfully with a luggage trolley. “Yes, I’d have to say you do, Dursley.”

“Has Ron saved a goal yet?” asked Hermione.
“Well, he can do it if he thinks no one is watching him,” said Fred, rolling his eyes. “So all we have to do is ask the crowd to turn their backs and talk among themselves every time the Quaffle goes up on his end Saturday.”

Draco: “You see, I, unlike you, have been made a prefect, which means that I, unlike you, have the power to hand out punishments.”
“Yeah,” said Harry, “but you, unlike me, are a git.”

Harry looked up at Ron. “Well,” he said, trying to sound as though he found this whole thing a joke, “if you want to – er – what is it?” He checked Percy’s letter. “Oh yeah – ‘sever ties’ with me, I swear I won’t get violent.”
“Give it back,” said Ron, holding out his hand.
“He is – ” Ron said jerkily, tearing Percy’s letter in half, “the world’s” – He tore it into quarters – “biggest” – He tore it into eighths – “git.” He threw the pieces into the fire.
“Come on, we’ve got to finish this essay sometime before dawn,” he said briskly to Harry, pulling Professor Sinistra’s essay back toward him.
Hermione was looking at Ron with an odd expression on her face.
“Oh, give them here,” she said abruptly.
“What?” said Ron.
“Give them to me, I’ll look through them and correct them,” she said.
“Are you serious? Ah, Hermione, you’re a lifesaver,” said Ron, “what can I – ?”
“What you can say is, ‘We promise we’ll never leave our homework this late again,’ ” she said, holding out both hands for their essays, but she looked slightly amused all the same.
“Thanks a million, Hermione,” said Harry weakly, passing over his essay, and sinking back into his armchair, rubbing his eyes.
…(Later on) “Okay, write that down,” Hermione said to Ron, pushing his essay and a sheet covered in her own writing back to Ron, “and then copy out this conclusion that I’ve written for you.”
“Hermione, you are honestly the most wonderful person I have ever met,” said Ron weakly, “and if I’m ever rude to you again – ”
” – I’ll know you’re back to normal,” said Hermione.

Mrs. Weasley let out a shriek just like Hermione’s.
“I don’t believe it! Oh, Ron, how wonderful! A prefect! That’s everyone in the family!”
“What are Fred and I, next-door neighbours?” said George indignantly, as his mother pushed him aside and flung her arms around her youngest son.

“Yes – yes, good point, Petunia! What were you doing under our window, boy?
“Listening to the news,” said Harry in a resigned voice.
His aunt and uncle exchanged looks of outrage.
“Listening to the news! Again?
“Well, it changes every day, you see,” said Harry.

“We know you’re up to something funny,” said Aunt Petunia.
“We’re not stupid, you know,” said Uncle Vernon.
“Well that’s news to me,” said Harry, his temper rising, and before the Dursleys could call him back, he had wheeled about, crossed the front lawn, stepped over the low garden wall, and was striding off up the street.

“Excellent.” said Lupin, looking up as Tonks and Harry entered. “We’ve got about a minute, I think. We should get out into the garden so we’re ready. Harry, I’ve left a letter telling your aunt and uncle not to worry -”
“They won’t,” said Harry.
“That you’re safe -”
“That’ll just depress them.”
“- and you’ll see them next summer.”
“Do I have to?”